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Sarah Palin’s India Trip: Bill Clinton, Nelson Mandela Have Made Same Journey

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The jokes are already flying as Sarah Palin prepares to embark on a trip to India later this month, and more are surely to come. Will she rock a sari? Perhaps guest star in a Bollywood movie? Or bathe in the Ganges for a photo op?

Palin has been invited to give the keynote address, “My Vision of America,” at the two-day India Today conclave in New Delhi, an event hosted annually by the magazine since 2002. The March 18-19 event is sponsored by global business heavyweight Aditya Birla Group, a billion-dollar metals company, along with a bevy of industry co-sponsors.

The news came in late February via her cybermessenger, Rebecca Mansour, who tweeted: “Governor Palin will be travelling to India next month.” Neither Palin nor Mansour has expounded on the details of trip.

Representatives for India Today did not return e-mails about Palin’s trip. India Today is the country’s most diversified media group, with interests in magazines, newspaper, television, radio, Internet, books and music.

It is unclear if she is getting paid to appear, but Palin usually charges upwards of $100,000 for such speaking engagements, according to various news accounts.

Palin has traveled outside the United States only a few times since Sen. John McCain chose her as his running mate in 2008. At that point, she had only traveled to the Middle East to visit U.S. troops. Since then, she has given a speech in Hong Kong and visited Haiti alongside Franklin Graham, son of evangelist Billy Graham.

An article by the magazine on the conclave website states: “Her visit to India has generated immense buzz in U.S. political circles over if she will run for president in 2012. Palin is reportedly shy of traveling abroad but her keynote address at the India Today Conclave 2011 is seen as an attempt to articulate foreign policy where she was found wanting in her 2008 bid for V-P, say some experts.”

New York Sun columnist Pranay Gupte describes the gathering as the “biggest private-sector megaphone in the world’s largest democracy.”

Palin will certainly have plush accommodations and the chance to mingle among international intelligentsia.

The event will be at the Taj Palace Hotel New Delhi, which sits on “six acres of lush greens in the exclusive Diplomatic Enclave of the city,” and is only 10 minutes from the airport, “well equipped, offering simultaneous translation in five languages.”

India’s prime minister, Manmohan Singh, will deliver the opening keynote address at the event themed “The Changing Balance of Power.” Other speakers include feminist writer Germaine Greer speaking on a panel titled “Can the Burqa Co-Exist With the Bikini?” and Egyptian opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei, who gives a dinner keynote on “The New Middle East.”

For a governor who served only 31 months in office, Palin is in fairly auspicious company.

In the event’s inaugural year, Al Gore spoke, and the next year Bill Clinton appeared. Since then, special guests have included Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama, Colin Powell, Pakistan President Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Afghanistan President H. E. Hamid Karzai, and Hillary Clinton, who spoke when she was senator of New York.

Some Palin critics have said that her trip is a slap in the face to key 2012 states, like Iowa and New Hampshire, and her absence from those venues signals that she is not running for president.

“I know, presidential candidates like to travel abroad to boost their foreign policy credentials. And Palin needs those credentials badly,” wrote Andrew Cline, the editorial page editor of the New Hampshire Union Leader. “But I find it hard to believe that, presumably less than a year from the primary, someone who makes a trip to India a higher priority than a trip to New Hampshire is a serious presidential candidate.”

But hold on, say some political watchers, who argue Palin has time to go to India and still be a powerful 2012 player.

Dr. Lara Brown, assistant professor of political science at Villanova University, tells Politics Daily: “The first thing that comes to mind is that she is preparing for a presidential run. Presidential aspirants typically travel internationally before the invisible primary season gets under way.”

Brown notes that Nixon was one of the first to do this after losing his 1960 presidential bid against John F. Kennedy and his 1962 loss to Pat Brown in the California gubernatorial race. He traveled to Europe, Japan and Vietnam where he hosted press conferences and met with leaders.

“Foreign travel gives the candidates a broader perspective on the world and allows them to talk in a more informed way about foreign policy,” Brown said.

While it is unclear whether Palin lobbied for a spot on the conclave ticket or the group reached out to invite her, India is an interesting choice of country for her to visit. The Obama administration has given keen attention to the South Asia republic. The first White House state dinner the Obamas hosted was in honor of the Indian prime minister and they visited India just three months ago.

It’s also a smart trip politically because Indian-Americans have increasing clout in the American political process. Republican Gov. Nikki Haley of South Carolina, who Palin supported, is the daughter of Indian immigrant parents as is Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, also a Republican.

The Indian American Conservative Council (IACC), a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization that supports conservative, pro-business values, has praised her visit. “It is only fitting that Palin travel to New Delhi since India is an economic partner with the United States, with both nations benefiting from $50 billion in annual trade, along with mutual cooperation in the global war on terrorism,” IACC chairman Dino Teppara said in a statement.

Palin could use the conclave platform to counter many of Obama’s viewpoints, and she is going into friendly territory. India likes female leaders, such as the powerful Sonia Gandhi, president of the Indian National Congress, the lead party in India’s coalition. Gandhi is the daughter-in-law of Indira Gandhi, who was assassinated in 1984.

India media reports frequently on Palin and her family. A Google search covering the period from Jan. 1, 2010, to Jan. 1, 2011, turns up 2.4 million hits pairing Sarah Palin and India, most of them from Indian media. Palin’s trip to India could be just political curiosity on both her part and the country’s movers and shakers. But it could be a diplomatic springboard into the 2012 presidential waters.

Correction: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated how long Sarah Palin was governor of Alaska. She was governor for 31 months, not 18 months.

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Written by suziparker1313

March 10, 2011 at 4:14 am

Posted in 2012 President, Sarah Palin

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Joe McGinniss Engages Sarah Palin Via Twitter as Manuscript Controversy Plays Out

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Sarah Palin’s cybermessenger, Rebecca Mansour, likes to tweet. In doing so lately, she’s contributed to a new storyline involving her boss and two writers intent upon telling tales about her.

On Feb. 11, she tweeted Joe McGinniss, the author who for a time lived next door to Palin’s Alaska home to work on a book about the 2008 vice presidential candidate. The tweet said: “@joemcginniss have you taken to cyber stalking now that you’re no longer living next door to @SarahPalinUSA? #creepy”

Earlier that same day, McGinniss had responded to one of Mansour’s tweets that said “Praying for the Christians of the Middle East.” McGinniss asked her: “Only the Christians?”

McGinniss only follows three people on Twitter — Palin, Mansour and Gerard Piqué, a Barcelona soccer player. He only recently resumed tweeting in February after nearly a five-month hiatus.

Soon after doing so, McGinniss leaked a rival manuscript on Palin, written by Frank Bailey, a former longtime aide to the possible presidential candidate, to the Anchorage Daily News.

Bailey had been Palin’s chief of staff when she was governor — a job she gave up in 2009 with a year and a half still to serve. Bailey tried to sell a book proposal that year but failed. More recently, he teamed up with two ghostwriters on the new project with the working title “Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin: A Memoir of Our Tumultuous Years.”

According to news outlets with access to the manuscript, Bailey cites many e-mails from his then boss, including one in which Palin said, “I hate this damn job.”

Bailey was also a key player in the Troopergate scandal that came to national attention after Palin became Sen. John McCain’s GOP running mate in 2008. It involved an investigation into why Palin dismissed her public safety commissioner after he refused to fire state trooper Mike Wooten – with whom Palin’s sister was involved in a child custody battle when the couple divorced in 2006. In the manuscript, Bailey writes that Todd Palin recruited him to go after Wooten, saying, “It’s time to get s–t, done, and it’s us, Frank. You and me.”

Other allegations include Palin illegally coordinating with the Republican Governor’s Association to film a campaign spot during her 2006 run for governor.

Bailey collaborated on the book with Ken Morris and Jeanne Devon (the latter is a founding editor of The Mudflats Blog, which is often critical of Palin).

The Carol Mann Agency in New York is shopping the manuscript to publishers. According to Publisher’s Marketplace, the agency represents Queen Latifah, conservative pundit Thomas Sowell and television sports reporter Hannah Storm.

One of the ghostwriters told the Associated Press that the manuscript is preliminary and had not been authorized for dissemination. It’s unclear why McGinniss leaked the manuscript — the Daily News says it received copies from him as well as other sources — or how he obtained it. The ghostwriters have accused him of copyright infringement by distributing it without authorization. As a result, they allege, potential interest in their work has been diminished. They claim McGinniss is a jealous author intent on sabotaging his competition.

McGinniss is a best-selling author whose works include “The Selling of the President 1968,” which landed on The New York Times bestseller list when McGinniss — now in his late-sixties — was just 26.

In November 2009, McGinniss’ representative, the David Black Literary Agency, sold his Palin manuscript to Broadway Books. According to the Publishers’ Marketplace database, the book is described as “an investigative narrative of Sarah Palin’s significance as both political and cultural phenomenon and as an embodiment of the contradictory forces that shaped Alaska as it moved into its second half-century as a state.”

In May 2010, he moved next door to the Palins’ house in Wasilla and began research for the work. (On her Facebook page, Palin warned him to stay away from her children.) Last September, he moved out, and tweeted: “Palin’s next neighbors: sadly, I leave Lake Lucille but am told a Muslim group will move in next week to establish a community center.”

On Feb. 12, McGinniss tweeted to @SarahPalinUSA: “Book has never been delayed. Always planned for fall. On schedule for publication Sept. 20.”

He followed that tweet with: “Cover release now set for week of Feb. 21. My website and Facebook fan page for THE ROGUE also coming soon.”

For all parties, any publicity is good publicity. It can only help with pre-orders on Amazon for McGinniss’ book. As for Bailey, a book deal is likely in his inbox.

But in this publishing mystery, questions remain: How did McGinniss get access to the Bailey manuscript? Had Bailey confessed Palin secrets to McGinniss? Isn’t the book market strong enough for two Palin tomes? Who benefits the most from creating trouble among all these parties?

To some extent, the answers will likely play out on Twitter.

Written by suziparker1313

March 10, 2011 at 4:00 am

Protecting the Palin Brand: Sarah and Bristol Go for Trademark Status

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Sarah Palin has become an industry. The former Alaskan governor has had books deals, starred in a reality television show and set up a political PAC that raised $3.5 million last year. Through midterm election endorsements, broadcast on her 2.7 million-fan Facebook page or via her 400,000 follower Twitter feed, Palin has cemented alliances to new GOP governors such as South Carolina’s Nikki Haley and various members of Congress.

But Palin is more than just a former mayor, governor, vice presidential candidate and political force. She has catapulted over most politicians to a status of entertainment icon. She has become a brand — and she’s trying to protect it by trademarking her name.

The Palin brand is so valuable, that other family members are in on it. Sarah Palin’s 20-year-old daughter, Bristol, is a well-compensated spokeswomen on sexual abstinence for the Candie’s Foundation, has become a reality star in her own right on “Dancing with the Stars” and may land a job as a radio show host in Arizona.

And these savvy women are taking all the prudent steps a brand holder does to protect an asset. In the last several months, Politics Daily has learned that the Palin family lawyer, Alaska attorney Thomas Van Flein, has filed applications to the United States Patent and Trademark Office to trademark “Sarah Palin®” and “Bristol Palin®.”

According to patent office application (serial # 85170226), Van Flein registered for a trademark of “Sarah Palin” on Nov. 5, 2010 — three days after the midterm elections. The government trademark examining attorney has “found no conflicting marks that would bar registration.” In other words, nobody else had already taken the proposed trademark.
A “Bristol Palin” application (serial #85130638) was filed on Sept. 15, 2010. Bristol Palin’s stint with “Dancing With the Stars” premiered on Sept. 20.

Celebrities often trademark their names to protect their image or brand from others who might try to cash in on their likeness or use their name in an inappropriate way.

According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office website, the Palin applications are still active, but not without problems.

For Sarah Palin’s application, there are two classes of commercial service for which her name would be a registered trademark. One is for “information about political elections” and “providing a website featuring information about political issues.” The second is for “educational and entertainment services … providing motivational speaking services in the field of politics, culture, business and values.”

The “Bristol Palin” application is for “educational and entertainment services, namely, providing motivational speaking services in the field of life choices.”

Both applications were assigned to the same examining attorney, Karen K. Bush. Bush is no stranger to trademark applications with a political slant. The patent attorney ruled in 2007 that a man could not file a trademark application on the name Obama bin Laden.

The current status on the Sarah Palin application indicates the patent office wants more information — specifically, it seems the application is missing Sarah Palin’s written consent to have her name trademarked. It is not known whether that issue has been cleared up.

Palin’s application also had other issues. When someone applies for a trademark, the patent office wants an example of how his or her name has been used for a commercial purpose. Examples include “signs, photographs, brochures, website printouts or advertisements” that show the proposed trademark “used in the actual sale or advertising of the services.” The samples submitted with Sarah’s form were a copy of a Fox News Channel webpage dated Jan. 11, 2010 featuring a story with the headline “Palin to Join Fox News as Contributor,” and a PDF file of a screen shot from the Washington Speakers Bureau website containing the former Alaska governor’s biography plus another screen shot of her Facebook profile.

Bush, the examining attorney, wrote that the examples were insufficient and did not show any commercial use connected to political elections. Palin was asked to send another example.

Bush also had questions regarding the initial date — 1996 — that Palin said she first used her name for a commercial purpose. That year, Palin served as a member of the Wasilla City Council and in October 1996 was elected mayor. The query suggests the patent examiner would like Sarah Palin to prove she was using her name at that time in a commercial capacity in regard to “political election information and providing a website about political issues.”

Bush did rule that that the examples submitted for “educational and entertainment services and motivational speaking” were acceptable.

The file is still pending, and Palin and her attorney were given six months to respond. So far, according to a spokeswoman at the United States Patent and Trademark Office, if her attorney has responded, the letter has not been uploaded to the government website. Van Flein did not return calls or e-mails for this story.

Bristol Palin’s application has similar problems as her mother’s. It wasn’t signed and didn’t show her proposed trademark used in a commercial context. She must file examples that demonstrate how “Bristol Palin” is used in the actual sale or advertising of her “motivational speaking services in the field of life choices,” according to Bush’s letter to Van Flein.

Politicians seldom trademark their name but they might do so to prevent others from using it, for example, to sell shoddy, unapproved merchandise or “official” candidate memorabilia. A search for other political figures such as President Barack Obama and potential 2012 GOP presidential candidates Mike Huckabee, Tim Pawlenty and Mitt Romney do not show any pending trademark applications. It is a rarity, say trademark attorneys, for political figures to file such forms.

The Palins are facing a long road in the effort to trademark their names. “Generally one can trademark one’s name,” said Jeffrey S. Kravitz, a Los Angeles-based intellectual property attorney. “But, it is not easy.”

Princess Diana and Sarah Palin: Mirror Images?

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Sarah Palin is the political Princess Diana.

That’s what one GOP source told me recently. “Let’s be honest. If she didn’t have looks, we wouldn’t be talking about her. You wouldn’t be covering her. She’s like Princess Diana.”

Shallow? Yes. But isn’t there truth there?

Princess Diana captured hearts at age 19 when Prince Charles selected her as a bride. Sarah Palin hit the scene when Sen. John McCain picked her as his running mate, although she’d already had a spread in Vogue as Alaska’s governor.

Princess Diana, for the most part, was a celebrity who used her power for good. Sure, she visited the White House and danced with John Travolta. She engaged in charity work, especially in the areas of AIDS and leprosy. She wore stunning clothes but gave very few interviews. She seemed unapproachable, like a China doll to be admired but not touched, even in the last year of her life when she lobbied in a high-profile crusade against land mines.

Palin was mayor of Wasilla, Alaska, but then gave up her governorship to spend more time in the lower 48 states. Palin’s charity work comes in the form of SarahPAC. She shows up, and candidates raise a lot of money for their campaigns. Many politicos agree that Palin hasn’t done much as far as resume building, say like Hillary Clinton, who served eight years in the Senate, for a White House run.

Ed Rollins, a veteran Republican consultant, said this week that Palin is “a media star and a great curiosity” but is lacking on political credentials. Rollins said on CNN, “You were plucked out of political obscurity because of the whim of presidential contender John McCain, who didn’t know you and made you into an overnight sensation. You performed well for three weeks in the campaign, did better than expected against Joe Biden in the debate, and then you self-destructed.”

Rollins may have gone a little far by using “self-destruct” to describe Palin. If anything, she has reinvented herself much in the vein that Diana did after her divorce from Prince Charles. Palin has carved a path in Republican politics using SarahPAC and social media. If Diana were alive in the 21st century, she might very well give Palin or Lady Gaga a run for their tweets by engaging with her fans online.

Diana made headlines just for crossing a street or wearing a designer gown — or even a pair of blue jeans — with paparazzi in tow. In this modern age of microscopic details, Palin gets attention every time she tweets, posts a Facebook note, signs a book or appears on a radio or television show. It doesn’t matter if she is commenting on WikiLeaks, North Korea, Alaska or her daughter Bristol’s recent appearance on “Dancing With the Stars.” Women want Palin’s upswept hairstyle and her glasses.

Trendsetting aside, Palin shares with Diana a must-have job skill to catapult to the celebrity stratosphere — working the media — including, these days, social media.

It may seem like Palin talks a lot, but, in fact, she doesn’t. Like Diana and the royal family, Palin tightly controls her own message with the help of Rebecca Mansour, a mystery woman who is communications director for SarahPAC. Mansour allegedly tweets and posts Facebook notes for Palin in the former vice-presidential candidate’s unyielding, and at times snarky, tone. Palin has even created her own show about Alaska to further enhance an image of a Mama Grizzly who takes no prisoners or animals. Or fish!

Palin only appears on television shows that are “Sarah friendly,” which don’t play hardball or ask her questions she doesn’t want to answer. Diana often did the same thing.

As some outlets reported at the time of her death, Diana indulged in a passive-aggressive love affair with the media. She favored reporters who helped create her image of a golden goddess in a “loveless marriage.” She, along with a press secretary (a royal version of Mansour) and later solo, used the media to sculpt her image through favored media contacts.

As PBS’ “Frontline” reported in 1997, one editor invited Diana to lunch at The Sun. Diana let him know she knew all about him. She teased him with “I hear you are a friend of Camilla’s.” As the “Frontline” story says, “The truth is that the princess had been colluding in her own coverage at least since March 1991.”

Sound familiar? Palin coined the term “lamestream media” to call out those who don’t play her game.

It only helps that, like Diana, Palin has great hair, a marathoner’s body and a telegenic face. The Learning Channel isn’t exactly rushing to sign Sharron Angle for a show about Nevada.

Even after Diana’s death, the royal spotlight shone on the royal family. Diana’s son, Prince William, and his impending wedding to Kate Middleton will keep all eyes on all things royal for months to come. Palin, in the same vein, is using her family to keep herself in the news.Through her reality television show, Palin introduces audiences on her own terms to her immediate family, as well as nieces and nephews.

It’s as if Palin is creating her own royal family since America doesn’t have one.

Diana wanted to seem more like a commoner after her failed marriage. Palin, a political commoner, wants to show the world that she isn’t a blue-blood living in a mansion — while making the money so she could. So far, she’s doing very well at the game.

Sarah Palin in a Little Rock Sam’s Club: Signs Books, Ignores Media

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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Sam’s Club – the Walmart-owned megastore that sells almost everything in bulk – is hardly the epitome of glamour.

So where does a superstar like Sarah Palin set up shop to sign books here? Amid the pallets of canned green beans? Behind the sea of poinsettias? Near the crates of toilet paper? Palin’s choice: In the back of the store behind the frozen-food freezers.

But her reception in Clinton – and Mike Huckabee – country was anything but chilly.

More than 500 people lined up on a cold night here to meet Palin, who signed her new book, “America by Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag,” earlier in the day at a stop in Baton Rouge, La. Some arrived before 5 a.m. to get in line for one of the 500 coveted purple wristbands entitling the wearer to get two books signed and to meet Sarah. That’s what her fans call her: “Sarah.” Simply Sarah, as if she is a best friend.

Members of the media were scooped up, identified and herded away immediately upon their arrival to a spot near the throngs of Palinites, whose ages ranged from 5 to 85, with some in wheelchairs and many with canes. A media escort spilled to me that Tuesday’s crowd was considerably smaller than Palin’s previous one last December, when more than 1,500 people showed up in northwest Arkansas to brave frigid weather for a brush with Palin and a copy of “Going Rogue.”

Near the front door of Sam’s Club, hundreds of copies of “America by Heart” were neatly stacked and adorned with $15.88 stickers. Before I could pick up a book, a media wrangler had corralled me into the snack area with other reporters. Polite but jittery, she repeatedly informed us that absolutely no questions could be asked of Palin. If anyone dared ask, they would be escorted out by security. She was adamant.

An elderly man wearing a purple wristband sat down with the media and handed the wrangler two copies each of “Blue Collar Christianity” and “Actions of the Early Church” by James F. Holmes to give to Palin. The wrangler then escorted the first team of photographers back to Palin.

Ten minutes later, they emerged frustrated.

“You have to shoot through people standing in front of her,” one photographer said, describing the area as the size of a phone booth behind black curtains.

The wrangler gathered up my group and escorted us past electronics, gigantic gun safes and boxes of enormous Christmas balls. “No questions,” she reminded us, as if we could have forgotten. “Ten minutes is all you get. No questions.”

In a line against a wall, fans waited with anticipation. They obediently shed coats and hoodies and placed them alongside their cameras and cell phones in rubber bins for security men who acted more like TSA agents than Sam’s Club employees. No photos, no recordings of any kind. Period.

It was a vastly different scene than the one my WomanUp colleague, Joann Weiner, wrote about earlier in the day about former President Jimmy Carter’s book signing in Washington.

We entered through a small tunnel of black curtains and stood behind a red rope line. There was Palin — sitting at a long table with a stack of books — and her youngest daughter, Piper, standing next to her. An American flag hung behind her. The Christian books from the elderly man sat on a tall table in the corner. An oversized poster of Palin’s book jacket leaned against it.

Palin wore a shiny black jacket with sleeves edged in sequins and a rhinestone American flag pin on the lapel. The former vice-presidential candidate smiled like a star as she scribbled “Sarah” — no personal inscriptions — in books. She wore her hair in her trademark upsweep, and a rose lipstick glossed her lips. Her nails sported a perfect French manicure.

In contrast, Piper’s nails were bright red as she fanned a stack of bookmarks, which she never passed out. She wore a black coat and her hair was combed back in a ponytail. A man behind the media pen informed a fan that Willow, another Palin daughter, was in the back.

A woman standing at the end of the table quickly stormed over and informed us that reporters were not supposed to be there. But the wrangler said it was fine. “No questions,” the woman said. A few minutes later, she told us she was with HarperCollins, Palin’s publishing company, and not Sam’s Club.

Palin shook hands with each person and asked their names. She quickly kept the line moving with small talk and no mention of North Korea, WikiLeaks or Barbara Bush. Piper leaned in at one point and told her mother something in a bossy tone and pointed toward the back of the store. The little girl looked angry as Palin smiled at her.

A woman and her young daughter approached Palin and discussed home schooling. A little boy then shook Palin’s hand.

“Study hard and read a lot of history,” she told him.

Two 20-something women tried to contain their glee when they entered the small area. Smiles radiated across their faces. They shook Palin’s hand, and she asked the one wearing scrubs if she were a nurse.

Before she could answer, reporters had to exit the area. The nurse, Susie Parkes, quickly followed with her sister, Katie, also a nurse.

“We’re her No. 1 fans,” Susie Parkes said, clutching her signed book. “We love her values and what she stands for and what she has done for our country.”

Katie Parkes echoed her sister. “She is bringing back values we need in this country that we have somehow lost. She stands for family and working-class America.”

“She said we had good hearts because we’re nurses and thanked us for doing the jobs we’re doing,” Susie Parkes said.

On Wednesday, the sisters were upgrading their cable system for the sole reason of watching “Sarah Palin’s Alaska” on The Learning Channel. They said they would “absolutely” vote for her if she ran for president in 2012.

As I left, people were still standing in the cold and dark to meet Palin. At a busy intersection near Sam’s Club, one lonely protester stood holding a homemade sign that called Palin a quitter for resigning her Alaskan governor’s position. Palin’s handlers likely made sure she never saw the man.

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 10:48 pm

Sarah Palin: You Really Can See Russia From Alaska

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According to Sarah Palin, you really can see Russia from Alaska. Just maybe not from her house, as Tina Fey joked on Saturday Night Live in 2008.

On Sunday, Palin wrote a Facebook note titled “Alaska’s Position on the Globe (Yes, You Can See Russia!)” that stressed her endorsement of Republican Alaska Senate candidate Joe Miller.

Palin, a possible 2012 presidential candidate, wrote that at a Miller rally last week, she said that change was needed in Washington so Alaska could “finally develop our natural resources to help secure the union.”

She wrote that she included a “riff” on the fact people can see Russia from Alaska. She said Alaskans have sent her numerous pictures that prove Russia can be seen from Alaska and that “put to rest the lamestream media’s mocking of that point.”

“We are proud of our strategic location as the air crossroads of the world, our rich natural resources, and our valuable shipping and transportation lanes affecting the commerce of Pacific Rim countries,” she wrote.

She posted a picture of a man she described as a “tough Alaskan” in a baseball cap and leather jacket. Over his shoulder is the Russia mainland, the caption said.

The Alaska-Russia controversy erupted in 2008 when ABC’s Charlie Gibson asked Palin, “What insight into Russian actions particularly in the last couple of weeks, does the proximity of this state give you?”

Palin said: “They’re our next-door neighbors. And you can actually see Russia from land here in Alaska.”
The debate continues on the Web: several sources say Russia can be seen from a small Alaskan island, but others argue it’s impossible to see Russia from the Alaskan mainland, as they say Palin has implied.
Comedian Tina Fey, playing Sarah Palin during a skit, joked that she could see Russia from her house.

The Palin post generated nearly 2,000 responses and more than 8,000 “likes.” Many praised Palin for taking on the media and said she was the only one for president in 2012.

“You need more than real pictures to prove it to the morons in the press that only know how to repeat the liberal talking points,” one commenter said.

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 10:24 pm