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Lady Gaga and Target Unite for LGBT Causes

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Lady Gaga has power, and to snicker at it is a mistake.

The 25-year-old pop goddess played hardball with Minnesota-based retailer Target and won.

Target wanted a special edition of her newest hit, “Born This Way,” which has already been called a gay anthem by Elton John. (Upon its release two weeks ago, it became the fastest-selling song ever on iTunes.) Lady Gaga wasn’t so willing to agree, given that Target had previously supported political candidates with anti-gay reputations.

“That discussion was one of the most intense conversations I’ve ever had in a business meeting,” Lady Gaga told Billboard.com. “Part of my deal with Target is that they have to start affiliating themselves with LGBT charity groups.”

She didn’t stop there. “Our relationship is hinged upon their reform in the company to support the gay community and to redeem the mistakes they’ve made supporting those [anti-gay] groups,” she said.

Target took heat last year for giving $150,000 to support a political action group, Minnesota Forward, that supported Minnesota gubernatorial candidate Tom Emmer, who backed a constitutional ban on gay marriage.

The company has pledged almost a half-million dollars to gay-equality groups so far in 2011, according to Billboard. One of them is Project 515, a Minnesota organization that wants gay families treated equally with straight families under state law. Target officials told Billboard that they had always supported groups in the LGBT community.

They added that Lady Gaga did not solely influence their decisions. “Certainly her perspective was very helpful in conversations,” Dustee Tucker Jenkins, Target’s vice president of public relations, said. “But we’ve considered a variety of different perspectives along the way, and that’s gotten us to where we are today.”

Target did not return calls for this story.

Lady Gaga has become a force in LGBT activism. In 2010, she supported repeal of the “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy banning gays from serving openly in the military, and asked her fans (whom she dubbed “Little Monsters”) to put pressure on their senators for repeal.

Just this week, Lady Gaga teamed up with M•A•C Cosmetics for a second year in a row, announcing that sales of lipstick and “lipglass” shades she helped design will go toward fighting HIV/AIDS. (Lady Gaga is a strong advocate for safe sex and AIDS testing.) The company has released a promotional video in conjunction to the lipstick line.

The video for “Born This Way” launches online Monday.

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Written by suziparker1313

March 10, 2011 at 4:02 am

Lady Gaga Pushes ‘Born This Way’; Sarah Palin Backs Gay Group

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Sarah Palin and Lady Gaga on the same page?

When it comes to expanding rights for gays and lesbians, the two powerful media mavens — one on the left, one on the right — appear to share some similar views.

On Friday, Lady Gaga is blanketing the media to promote her new album, “Born This Way,” which won’t even be released until May 23. The title, which is also the first single released Friday, says it all, and the song is already being called a 21st century gay anthem by the likes of Sir Elton John.

Earlier this week, Sarah Palin restated that she supported GOProud, a self-identifying gay group, and that they should be included in this week’s Conservative Political Action Conference in Washington, D.C.

Palin, who is not appearing at CPAC, said on Fox News, “I don’t have a problem with different, diverse groups that are involved in political discourse, and having a convention to talk about what the answers are to their problems that face America.”

Her position is a rarity among most conservatives, but Lady Gaga would be proud. Maybe she’ll discuss it with Anderson Cooper on “60 Minutes” this Sunday. Or perhaps Palin will get a shout-out at the Grammy’s when Lady Gaga performs later that night.

While February was deemed a no Sarah Palin zone (it hasn’t exactly worked), Lady Gaga is about to seize the rest of the month.

No one – not even Palin – knows how to work media, social and otherwise, like Lady Gaga. She has more Twitter followers (more than 8 million) and Facebook fans (28 million) than any politician, including President Barack Obama (18 million) or Palin (2.7 million). She’s a powerhouse who’s already sold millions of records and broken social media and YouTube records. She can make any Twitter hashtag trend in less than an hour and uses Facebook to communicate with fans.

Last year, she took on Washington, challenging numerous politicians, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, during the “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” battle. Millions of her fans, called Little Monsters, bombarded Capitol Hill with calls asking their senators to repeal DADT.

The repeal movement succeeded, despite conservatives’ resistance, and Gaga can certainly share the credit.

Like her right-wing Alaskan sister, she generates controversy.

Lady Gaga appears on the March cover of “Vogue” in a pink 1920s flapper wig. Lady Gaga leaked the magazine cover on Facebook, which reportedly infuriated Vogue editors.

Then there’s the dance-pop “Born This Way” song itself.

The lyrics focus on civil rights for an array of people — “black, white, beige” and gay and straight, Gaga says. But she throws in a couple of words that have puzzled and angered people — “chola descent” and the passé word, “orient,” to describe Asians.

“Chola,” in urban slang, describes a negative stereotype of hardcore Latina gangbangers, and some in the Latino media have slammed Lady Gaga for using it.

So is Lady Gaga a racist or simply ignorant of the meaning of ‘chola’?” asked the website My Latino Voice.

On Thursday, more controversy bubbled when Lady Gaga announced that she had partnered with Target to offer an exclusive deluxe edition of her new album, “Born This Way.”

Last year, Target gave a $150,000 corporate donation to Republican candidate Tom Emmer — an opponent of same-sex marriage — in the Minnesota governor’s race. While Target’s chief executive apologized, amid protests and boycotts, the corporation declined to make a donation to pro-gay-rights groups. Maybe promoting Lady Gaga is the company’s way of calling it even?

Once the single was released Friday, music critics immediately started comparing it to Madonna’s 1989 hit, “Express Yourself.” Many outlets, including US magazine and Popeater, ran articles noting the songs’ similarities. Twitter was buzzing about the two songs. Lady Gaga has not responded to the comparison.

Palin, too, is facing a brewing controversy as liberal gay rights advocacy groups refuse to acknowledge her support of conservative gays.

Any hullabaloo is only good for Lady Gaga and Palin.

For now, Lady Gaga is blasting ahead full throttle with her enterprises — she recently became Polaroid’s creative director, co-designing a product line that includes an instant mobile printer, an instant digital camera and the “GL20 Camera Glasses” — still wearing the crown of reigning diva of the gay community.

Palin, ever smartly, could become a trailblazer by including gays and lesbians in the GOP dialogue just in time for 2012.

Written by suziparker1313

March 10, 2011 at 3:44 am

Top Five Celebrity Activists: Lady Gaga and a Palin, Too

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Star power goes a long way.

Celebrities can often shed light, or make a big impact, on a cause or an issue in ways that even the best public relations campaign simply cannot.

During World War II, Hollywood stars promoted war bonds, rationing and Victory gardens. These days, they take to social media and television to get their points across on myriad issues affecting the world.

Five celebrities who made a difference this year:

Lady Gaga: The pop superstar dipped her toe into celebrity activism in 2009 when she appeared at the National Equality March in Washington. But in 2010, Lady Gaga chose full-body immersion. She took on “Don’t ask, Don’t tell” and encouraged her “Little Monster” fans to make a ruckus by calling elected officials and asking them to repeal the law. For many Millennials, Lady Gaga’s call to action was the first time they realized that they could even call a senator.

The fashion diva, who took heat from PETA for a costume made from meat, also lambasted Arizona’s immigration law and took on the anti-gay Westboro Baptist Church when the hate group protested her St. Louis concert. Her solution: Embrace them with love and peace.

How did she motivate her fans to action? Via Facebook and Twitter. Lady Gaga rules social media with more followers and fans than any politician, including President Barack Obama.

Expect the 25-year-old Lady Gaga to continue her fight for GLBT rights in 2011 as her third studio album will be called “Born This Way.”

Sean Penn: Academy Award-winner Sean Penn went beyond the extra charitable mile in 2010. When Haiti suffered a devastating earthquake in January, Penn didn’t just write a check to a relief agency. Instead, he started his own organization and ventured to the ravaged country.

And he decided to stay.

Penn became a camp manager for the International Organization of Migration at Petionville, one of the most complex temporary camps in Haiti. The IOM is the United Nations agency responsible for camp management and coordination. He also traveled to Washington to testify at a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on rebuilding Haiti.

In December, Penn, 50, even skipped out of a fancy Dubai film festival where he was to receive a lifetime achievement award to return to Haiti because of concerns regarding the safety of his staff. He received the “Hollywood Humanitarian Award” at the Hollywood Awards for his “selfless” efforts.

Penn continues to stress the importance of medical supplies and doctors as the country battles cholera. He’s not going anywhere, he says. In fact, Penn has recently vowed to spend years in Haiti until the country is stable.

Michelle Obama: Like first ladies before her, Michelle Obama has a cause — childhood obesity. Sure, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Bill Clinton were pushing the issue long before Obama got on the scene, but she took the issue to a new level. She launched “Let’s Move,” a program to “raise a healthier generation of kids.”

She has called obesity a “national security threat” and an epidemic. Last year, she created a White House garden to show how easy it is to raise healthy food. She kicked off 2010 by speaking to the U.S. Conference of Mayors about the issue. This month, Obama celebrated a win when her husband signed into the law the child nutrition bill for which she strongly lobbied. The first lady isn’t above showing her hula-hooping skills or practicing with NFL teams to show kids how to exercise and get outside.

Her obesity campaign recently got Sarah Palin’s attention.

On her TLC reality television show, Palin said, “Where are the s’mores ingredients? This is in honor of Michelle Obama, who said the other day we should not have dessert.” In fact, Obama said, “The problem is when things get out of balance, when dessert is practically a food group.”

In turn, Huckabee, a former overweight diabetic who wrote a book about his weight battle, came to Obama’s defense. Don’t expect Michelle Obama to back down on the issue. She plans to make the battle against childhood obesity her White House legacy.

Bristol Palin: She tangoed her way into the consciousness of just about every American household this year on “Dancing With The Stars.” But she also did her fair share of advocacy against teen pregnancy. Palin was 17 and unmarried when she became pregnant.

In May, Palin appeared in a public service announcement for The Candie’s Foundation, an offshoot of the clothing brand that promotes awareness of teen pregnancy. In 2009, she was named an ambassador for the foundation.

During her “DWTS” appearance, Palin filmed another PSA promoting safe sex for the foundation with Jersey Shore star and fellow DWTS contestant, The Situation. He promotes condoms, Palin promotes abstinence.

In December, Keith Olbermann called Bristol Palin “the worst person in the world” because she preaches abstinence to teens even though she was an unwed teenager when she became a mom.
Palin pulled a Lady Gaga and took to her Facebook page to defend herself. She wrote: “In order to have credibility as a spokesperson, it sometimes takes a person who has made mistakes. Parents warn their children about the mistakes they made so they are not repeated. Former gang members travel to schools to educate teenagers about the risks of gang life.”

Palin graduated out of her teens this year but is likely to continue her abstinence message into her 20s. That is unless she finds a new cause.

Johnny Depp, Eddie Vedder, Natalie Maines and Patti Smith: Collectively, these four kindred spirits came together in of all places, Little Rock, Ark., to shed light on the West Memphis Three – Jason Baldwin, Damien Echols and Jessie Misskelley, Jr.

While teenagers, the three were charged with the murders of three 8-year-old boys, whose bodies were found in 1993 naked and bound in West Memphis, Ark. For the last 17 years, the three have been trying to get the Arkansas courts to retry the case. Echols sits on Arkansas Death Row. The other two men are serving life sentences.

Vedder and Depp have long been supporters of the West Memphis Three. Only this year, however, did Depp decide to become more vocal publicly about the case. Depp appeared on “48 Hours” to plead for a new trial and pulled his friend, punk goddess Patti Smith, into the project.

In August, Vedder, along with Arkansas Take Action advocates, led the charge to organize a concert to shed light on the need for new hearings in the case. Depp, Maines and Smith appeared. Depp read poems written by Echols and also sang and played guitar. Maines, too, performed, and Smith closed the evening with her classics.

The celeb firepower may have just worked.

The Arkansas Supreme Court ruled in November to allow new evidentiary hearings for the West Memphis Three.

Lady Gaga’s New Video: A Message to Senators on ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

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Lady Gaga is back at political activism.

On Monday night, Lady Gaga released a two-minute black-and-white video via YouTube to update her fans on the status of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

“Right now, we’re looking at tomorrow being a very important day for you guys all to really be paying attention,” she says, sitting on a couch in what appears to be a dressing room.

She adds: “Senators you have been put on notice by me and by the people of this country. You said you would debate and address this law when the Pentagon returned with a strategy and tomorrow morning you will have. Will you keep your word?”

Pentagon officials hit Capitol Hill on Tuesday to hand out advance copies of their study regarding DADT. They will brief staff members of the House and Senate Armed Services Committee in the morning. Supporters of the DADT repeal have urged Congress to allow the defense authorization bill and its repeal of DADT to come up for a vote once the study is released during the lame-duck session of Congress.

In a short bobbed blond wig and black sunglasses, Lady Gaga says that it is crucial that the Senate vote this week on the bill “otherwise it could take years for it to happen.”

“Social repression is currently running rampant in this country as many of you know,” Lady Gaga says in the video. “Kids are being led to believe that it’s OK to hate and condemn based on our differences and this recent horrific news of gay suicides is really proof of our social repression and ultimately government repression that is killing our youth.”

Lady Gaga says that the law should be repealed because it “reinforces discrimination” and “is setting a bad example” for this country’s youth.

The international pop star has been behind repealing DADT for several months. In September, she invited retired gay and lesbian service members to escort her to the MTV Video Music Awards to bring awareness to the issue. She also got Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s attention when she called him out on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.”

This is Lady Gaga’s second video on the issue. In September she also released a video telling her fans, which are called Little Monsters, to call their senators and ask them to support a repeal of DADT. She targeted Sen. John McCain of Arizona in that video. He is likely again to be a roadblock in this latest DADT battle.

Lady Gaga also traveled to Maine in September for a rally to persuade Sens. Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins to vote for the repeal. They voted against it.

Lady Gaga informs her Little Monsters to go to the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network website for information on contacting senators.

In the end, Lady Gaga, 24, defends her role in the cause: “Political activism when you’re a pop singer can be kinda trivial but in truth I feel very close to all of you and … you’re screaming, ‘Please end this law.’ Equality for all.”

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 10:44 pm

Lady Gaga: A Political Tsunami, Waiting to Hit

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Lady Gaga is a political force.

Don’t laugh. Just consider her activism this year. She has taken on several political hot potatoes – the anti-gay Westboro Baptist Church, Arizona’s immigration law, California’s same-sex marriage ban, and “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

For all of Lady Gaga’s outrageous costumes and catchy dance tunes, the 24-year-old singer, known as Mama Monster to her fans, has alerted the Millennial generation to issues that otherwise may have gone under their radar screens.

With a social media network larger than any politician’s, including President Barack Obama‘s or potential 2012 presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s, Lady Gaga is one of the most influential, and powerful, people in the world. Forbes Magazine ranked her seventh in its recent 2010 list of most powerful women. She didn’t even make the list in 2009.

The Native New Yorker – whose real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta – has 21 million Facebook fans (Obama has 15 million, Palin two million) and nearly seven million Twitter followers. The numbers increase daily. Her videos recently hit a milestone with one billion views on YouTube. Her adoring fans, also called Little Monsters, track her every move and respond eagerly to her calls for political action.

When she appeared at the MTV Video Music Awards in September, retired gay military officers from the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN) escorted her down the red carpet. Her political statement: Repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” The SLDN received an instant public relations boost that money cannot buy. More than 100,000 people visited the group’s Web site within 72 hours. Nearly 93 percent were new visitors.

After the show, Ellen DeGeneres invited Lady Gaga to her talk show. Dressed in her now-infamous meat dress, she used the talk show to call for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to schedule a Senate vote on “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” She also encouraged her fans to call Reid’s office. Naturally, she also tweeted, “CALL HARRY REID to Schedule Senate Vote.”

Reid returned the tweet, triggering a lovefest between the two: “@ladygaga There is a vote on #DADT next week. Anyone qualified to serve this country should be allowed to do so.”

The pop goddess continued to urge her Little Monsters to call their senators and ask them to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” She then challenged Sen. John McCain and other senators who opposed the repeal in a stark black and white video, where she also showed fans how to call their senators and what to say. She even headed to Portland, Maine, for a rally to try and persuade Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe to support the repeal.

When the bill failed, Lady Gaga vowed to continue her fight for gay and lesbian issues. Her next album will be called “Born This Way” – a shout-out to her LGBT fans, and she recently recorded a duet with Elton John.

Celebrity activism is nothing new. Ever since Bob Geldof’s Band-Aid in the 1980s, Bono has become a dedicated political saint, leading the charge on myriad causes, including debt relief for Africa. In the 1970s, Jane Fonda spoke out against the Vietnam War, and Marlon Brando focused on the Civil Rights Movement and Native American causes.

But Lady Gaga has harnessed the potential of 21st Century social media unlike any of her musical peers or even Washington politicians who pay consultants big money to work social media magic.

“She’s like a tribal leader,” says Gordon Coonfield, associate professor of communication at Villanova University. “Tribal leaders have their own influence and are about bringing networks together. She has her own influence and technology and a new kind of network power that traditional politics can’t really afford to ignore.”

A lot of celebrities tweet, but as Coonfield points out, Lady Gaga takes it a step beyond witty updates and relationship drama. She tweets not only about the cocktail she drank at a bar but also about serious topics.

“We are talking about issues that could change the military and fates of people,” Coonfield says.

Imagine if Lady Gaga decided to lead a march on Washington with millions of Little Monsters in tow. Unlike Glenn Beck, Lady Gaga has a colossal global following. She would shed an international light on her cause célèbre, and her crowd might very well dwarf Beck’s and Jon Stewart’s.

Lady Gaga, who made $62 million last year, likely won’t leave her music career any time soon to launch a run for office. But what if she decided to create GAGAPAC to donate to progressive candidates? One tweet would likely result in hefty donations and free publicity for the candidate of her choosing.

On another front, Lady Gaga might also give Palin’s Mama Grizzlies a run for their fur if she decided to endorse candidates and campaign – even virtually – for them. Who knows? Harry Reid might be on safer ground today if Lady Gaga had helped him in Nevada against Palin-backed Sharron Angle.

First Lady Michelle Obama may be the most powerful woman in the world, but Lady Gaga is not far behind. After all, Lady Gaga is already ahead of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, who ranks No. 11. If Lady Gaga maintains her star power into 2012, she could likely unleash her Little Monsters – many who may be voting in their first election – to become a progressive, liberal tsunami in GOTV efforts. And a real worry for conservatives.

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 10:22 pm

John McCain Reponds to Lady Gaga’s Effort to Repeal ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

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Two senators responded Friday to Lady Gaga’s campaign to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” which included the release of a YouTube video featuring the pop star Friday morning.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) told a radio station he hopes Lady Gaga realizes the repeal effort is “a pure political ploy” on the part of Democrats, and Sen. Kirsten Gillebrand (D-N.Y.) tweeted she opposes the 17-year-old law that bans gays from serving openly in the military and is “helping lead the fight to repeal DADT.”

Earlier Friday, Lady Gaga posted a seven-minute video aimed at McCain, Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), James Inhofe (R-Okla.), and Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) — as well as “youth all over the world who are watching.”

In a stark black-and-white video, Lady Gaga, wearing a black pants suit, white shirt and a black tie, sits in front of an American flag and asks the senators to repeal DADT.

She accuses the Obama administration of failing to protect 400 service members who have been discharged under the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy.

Lady Gaga, who has become a serious and powerful advocate for LGBT rights, says DADT forces those in the military to “hide and keep private” their sexuality in order to serve. She says the law is being used to profile gays in the military, and that superiors are going through their private e-mails and belongings.

“Gay soldiers have become targets,” she says. “In short, not only is the law unconstitutional, but it’s not even being properly or fairly enforced by the government.”

On Thursday, Gaga tweeted to her 6.3 million Twitter followers: “SENATOR JOHN MCCAIN is attempting to stop the DON’T ASK DON’T TELL repeal vote this Tuesday, with a filibuster.”

She offered her version of a virtual Civics 101 lesson, with a bit of spin: “A Filibuster is a way to obstruct the Senate Floor from discussing or voting on a given LAW, + is essentially a tactic to hijack our debate.” (In fact, filibusters do not stop discussion, only the vote itself.)
Friday, McCain responded to Lady Gaga in an interview with KFYI in Phoenix. “I hope she’ll continue to pay attention, and to watch the debates on the Senate floor, and understand that this is a pure political ploy on the part of [Senate Majority Leader] Harry Reid and Democrats who see their majority slipping away.”
McCain added, “They’re politicizing national security. People like Lady Gaga need to understand that the military is a unique institution,” he said.

“I am here to be a voice for my generation,” she says. “Not the generation of the senators who are voting, but for the youth of this country, the generation that is affected by this law and whose children will be affected. We’re not asking you to agree with, or approve the moral implications of homosexuality. We’re asking you to do your job, protect the Constitution.”

She continues in the video to tell stories about military men and women who have been discharged because of their sexual orientation.

At its end, she tells viewers how to call their senators through the Senate switchboard. Lady Gaga attempts to call her senator – Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) – on her Blackberry. The phone rings and she gets a busy signal. Lady Gaga smirks. She tries to call the other New York senator, Kirsten Gillebrand, whose voice mail is full.

She urges viewers to call Friday and explains what to say — vote with Sens Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Carl Levin (D-Mich.) to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and oppose McCain’s “shameless filibuster.”

 

Later in the day, Gillibrand wrote to Gaga on Twitter: “Thx for calling. I couldn’t agree more and am helping lead the fight to repeal DADT. Do you have a moment to talk later today?”The Wall Street Journal reported late Thursday that McCain may move to block the upcoming DADT repeal effort. It said that activists from Arizona-based Human & Equal Rights Organizers stood up during a Senate hearing on the security of the Korean peninsula and held signs with images from the civil rights era. One protestor’s sign read, “Senator McCain, repeal ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’ do you want to be the next George Wallace?”

McCain, a former Navy pilot, was a prisoner of war for more than five years in North Vietnam during the Vietnam War.

Lady Gaga’s activism on GLBT issues took center stage this week after she appeared on Sunday night’s MTV Video Music Awards program escorted by four gays from the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network. Media also noticed her back-and-forth tweets with Reid on the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” repealer, which is part of the Defense Authorization bill.

Her fans went into overdrive just minutes after Gaga tweeted her call to action. They retweeted her missive to thousands. One fan tweeted, “. . . #DADT needs to be stopped. Prejudice is a disease.”

Another tweeted about what McCain may expect in the days leading to the vote: “McCains VM box=full, so lets send a million tweets/emails telling him 2 allow the Vote on DADT.

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 9:32 pm

Lady Gaga’s ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ Activism Is Getting Results

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Lady Gaga’s activism works.

 

Just ask the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, a group dedicated to “ending discrimination and harassment of military personnel affected by ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,'” the policy that prevents gays from serving openly in the military, according to its Web site.
Four members of that group escorted Lady Gaga to the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday to help Lady Gaga publicize her campaign to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.”

 

The proof is in the numbers.

 

On Thursday, the group said 107,159 people clicked on its site within 72 hours after Lady Gaga had urged her fans to check it out. The group said that nearly 93 percent were first-time visitors to the action site.

The group’s Web site features a picture of Lady Gaga with her four escorts, gay military veterans, on the red carpet last Sunday at the awards show. Later, she asked viewers on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” to call Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to schedule a vote on “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” She also tweeted and posted a Facebook message to her Little Monster fans to call Reid.

His campaign responded to Lady Gaga via Twitter to let her know a vote is scheduled next week.

The Reid campaign kept responding to Gaga fans on Twitter Thursday afternoon to encourage them to read the bio on his campaign Web site.

Thursday afternoon, Reid filed for cloture on the motion to proceed to debate the National Defense Authorization Act, which contains the amendment aimed at repealing the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. This sets up a floor vote on the motion for Tuesday.

Lady Gaga, whose real name is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta, has been a LGBT activist since hitting the music scene in 2008. Last October, she spoke at the National Equality March rally in Washington and said it was the single most important event of her career.

Her Web site also features a call to action against “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” by encouraging fans to visit the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network Web site.

Written by suziparker1313

March 8, 2011 at 9:26 pm